regap retired Greyhounds as pets of Connecticut
Regap of CT homepage
Regap of CT
Greyhound FAQ's
Adopt a Rescued Greyhound
Greyhounds for adoption
Greyhound color chart
recued Greyhound photo gallery
contact Regap of CT
Greyhound links
Greyhound donations
PETSAFFAIR


GoodSearch animal banner

Goodshop

retired Greyhounds Greyhound rescue Greyhound adoption Greyhounds regap regap of connecticut

Description of the greyhound

History of the greyhound

Greyhounds: The Fastest Dogs On Earth

 

Description of the greyhound

For thousands of years Greyhounds have been bred to hunt by outrunning their prey. They were not intended to be solitary hunters, but to work with other dogs. Switching from hunting to racing has kept this aspect of their personality very much alive. The fastest breed of dog, Greyhounds can reach a top speed of 45 miles per hour, and can average more than 30 miles per hour for distances up to one mile. Selective breeding has given the Greyhound an athlete's body with the grace of a dancer. At the same time, the need to anticipate the evasive maneuvers of their prey has endowed the Greyhound with a high degree of intelligence.

The Greyhound has a long neck and head, with a barely noticeable stop, or bridge to his nose. The ears are small and usually folded flat back against the neck. The ears may stand semi- or fully erect when the Greyhound is attentive. This is called a "rose ear."

The back is long and muscular with an arch over the loin. The deep chest and narrow waist give the Greyhound its distinctive silhouette. The legs are long and powerful. The feet are small and compact, with well knuckled toes. The tail is long and curved.

The coat of a Greyhound is short and smooth, and is the result of crossing Greyhounds with Bulldogs in the mid-1700s. Greyhounds come in an endless variety of colors, including white, fawn (tan), cream, red (rust), black, blue (grey), many shades of brindle, and with patches of these colors on white. There is virtually no body fat. In general, Greyhounds are very clean and do not require a lot of grooming.

A show Greyhound typically stands between 26 and 30 inches and the shoulder, and weighs 60 to 85 pounds. Bitches average around 10 to 15 pounds less than dogs. The average lifespan is twelve to fourteen years. Track Greyhounds are often between 25 and 29 inches and 50 to 80 pounds. The AKC standard specifies 65-70lbs for males, 60-65 for females as ideal.

The Greyhound is a quiet and docile animal when not racing. While they can be somewhat aloof in the presence of strangers, more often they are generally friendly to most people. They are very affectionate toward those they know and trust.

The Greyhound is recognized by all major kennel clubs around the world, as well as by various national racing clubs such as the National Greyhound Association (NGA) and the American Greyhound Council.

Back to top

History of the greyhound

Greyhounds are one of the oldest breeds of dogs, and appear in art and literature throughout history. In ancient Egypt, Greyhounds were mummified and buried along with their owners, and tombs were often decorated with Greyhound figures. A hieroglyph of a dog very much resembling the modern breeds Greyhound, Saluki, and Sloughi can be found in the writings of ancient Egypt. Alexander the Great had a Greyhound named Peritas. The Greyhound is mentioned in the Old Testament (Proverbs 30:29-31), Homer (Odyssey, where the only one to recognize Odysseus upon his return was his Greyhound, Argus), Chaucer (The Canterbury Tales), and Shakespeare (Henry V and Merry Wives of Windsor). Greek and Roman gods and goddesses were often portrayed with Greyhounds.

As Clarke, in The Greyhound states:

But, ancient as the Greyhound is, it would be stretching the truth to claim that the Arabian hounds depicted on the ancestral tombs of ancient Egyptians were identical to the Greyhounds we know today. In their conformation, in their grace and pace, in the poetry of their motion, yes -- but not in the style of coat they wore! [...] In fact, there is reason to believe that the Arabian Greyhound may well have resembled a Saluki -- but for all, still a dog of the Greyhound family.
There are many differing explanations for the origin of the term Greyhound. One writer suggests that the original Greyhound stock was mostly grey in color. Another says the term derives from the Old English "grei," meaning "dog," and "hundr," meaning "hunter." Another explanation is that it is derived from "gre" or "gradus," meaning "first rank among dogs." Finally, it has been suggested that the term derives from Greekhound, since the hound reached England through the Greeks.

Greyhounds have long been associated with royalty. In fact, from the 11th to the 14th century, English law decreed that no "mean person" was allowed to keep a Greyhound. Penalty for breaking this law was death!

Back to top

Greyhounds: The Fastest Dogs On Earth

Greyhounds hold several unique distinctions among their canine brethren. Not only are they the oldest purebred dog, dating back to the Pharohs of Ancient Egypt, but they’re also the fastest dog on Earth. Greyhounds can run as fast as 45 miles per hour and can average 30 miles per hour for distances as a long as a mile.

As pets, Greyhounds receive high praise. They possess superior intelligence, but their character is sometimes undervalued because of their reserved behavior towards their master and toward strangers. The Greyhound is sensitive, courageous, loyal and, of course, very fast.

Please find room in your hearts and homes for these wonderful loving pets, they deserve a chance to be loved, happy and have a better life. If you would like more information on Greyhounds please contact us, or if you are ready to adopt one of these magnificent dogs please go to our adoption page and fill out the form. You will receive the biggest reward you can every imagine, a loyal and loving companion.

Back to top